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Category : Equipment Tips

27 Dec 2016

The Little Lions and Crocodile

In a split second, a potentially great wildlife photo is here and gone, forever. That’s why I suggest shooting in burst or continuous high release mode when there is a possibility of fast action. With continuous high release, when you press and hold down on the shutter-release button, the camera will take the maximum number of photos possible until the memory buffer is full or you lift your finger. The benefit is you have a sequence of the action shots…

09 Jan 2014

If You Can Bring One Lens Only

If you could bring only ONE lens from your camera bag to a wildlife photo outing, which one would you choose? With wildlife photography, your biggest, longest focal length lens or your telephoto lens is not always the best choice. Consider the following when choosing the right lens: Size of the subject. For small subjects, use a short focal length. Distance the subject is from you. For subjects far away from you, use a longer focal length so that the subject…

10 Aug 2013

Camera Settings for Hummingbird Photographs

Without Flash Both of the following photos were taken without flash: Photo A: Camera: Nikon D3s, Shutter Priority Mode, Shutter speed: 1/2000s, Aperture: f/5.6, ISO 2000, Matrix metering, Spot focus, Auto-focus Continuous. Lens: Nikon 200- 400mm f/4, focal length 400mm. On tripod. Photo B: Camera: Nikon D3s, Manual Mode, Aperture: f/4, Shutter speed: 1/1250s, ISO 1600, Spot metering, Spot focus, Auto-focus Continuous. Lens: Sigma 180mm Macro f/3.5. On monopod. Shutter speed is the most important setting when photographing hummingbirds in…

10 Jul 2013

How To Increase the Number of Sharp Photographs

There are specific camera settings and equipment factors that influence sharpness of the subject and overall photograph. Get the most value from the camera’s focus functions by understanding and applying these tips: Depth of Field Depth of field is how much of a given photograph is in sharp focus, from front to back. Only the subject you are focused on is tack sharp. Other elements in front of and behind the subject will be somewhat sharp. The following factors control…

10 Jun 2013

Capture Picture Perfect Butterfly Photographs

Follow these tips to get picture perfect butterfly photos: Use a macro lens with a minimum focus distance 12 inches or less so you can capture close-up, full frame detail. Position yourself at eye level to the butterfly. Keep the composition very simple. Do a four corner perimeter check around your frame and physically move your body to eliminate or add elements. Look for butterflies that are in pristine condition (i.e., no chips in their wings, both antennas, all legs, etc.).…