Next workshop:
  1. Post Processing Your Wildlife Images
    June 19, 2018 @ 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
  2. Create a SmugMug Website (The Basics)
    July 10, 2018 @ 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
  3. Red fox photo by Kathleen Reeder
    Wildlife in Minnesota
    July 24, 2018 - July 27, 2018
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Category : Equipment Tips

12 Apr 2018

Cool Gadget: MagMod Flash Modifier System

Do you use an external flash that slides into the hot shoe of your camera? If so, you’ll want to get the MagMod system to diffuse, extend and control the light from your flash. It’s the coolest gadget in town. I use it exclusively when using flash. It has replaced my Gary Fong Lightsphere, Lumiquest Softboxes and Better Beamers. No more velcro straps and flimsy attachments. It’s sturdy and fast to assemble. It’s pricier than the alternatives, but well worth the…

26 Nov 2017

Secrets to Photographing Horses by Bev Pettit

My photographic specialty is horses. I love to photograph horses because of their beauty of course. I also find them to be fierce yet intelligent, independent yet tolerant, and certainly a gracious subject to photograph. I began my career as an equine photographer when I moved back to the USA in 1996, after having lived in China and Europe for nine years. While living overseas I worked for a large American investment bank in publishing. During my free time I…

15 Oct 2017

“When the Student is Ready, The Teacher Will Appear” by Don Berman

It was 6:15 am and Janice, that’s my wife, and I were heading to the Riparian Preserve at Water Ranch, in Gilbert, Arizona, just a few miles south and east of Scottsdale. Riparian, an unusual word, means relating to wetlands adjacent to rivers and streams. I’m relatively new to wildlife photography and even newer to birds in flight, which some say is the most challenging type of wildlife photography there is. In 2014, I got an invite to attend a wildlife photo…

27 Dec 2016

The Little Lions and Crocodile

In a split second, a potentially great wildlife photo is here and gone, forever. That’s why I suggest shooting in burst or continuous high release mode when there is a possibility of fast action. With continuous high release, when you press and hold down on the shutter-release button, the camera will take the maximum number of photos possible until the memory buffer is full or you lift your finger. The benefit is you have a sequence of the action shots…

09 Jan 2014

If You Can Bring One Lens Only

If you could bring only ONE lens from your camera bag to a wildlife photo outing, which one would you choose? With wildlife photography, your biggest, longest focal length lens or your telephoto lens is not always the best choice. Consider the following when choosing the right lens: Size of the subject. For small subjects, use a short focal length. Distance the subject is from you. For subjects far away from you, use a longer focal length so that the subject…

10 Aug 2013

Camera Settings for Hummingbird Photographs

Without Flash Both of the following photos were taken without flash: Photo A: Camera: Nikon D3s, Shutter Priority Mode, Shutter speed: 1/2000s, Aperture: f/5.6, ISO 2000, Matrix metering, Spot focus, Auto-focus Continuous. Lens: Nikon 200- 400mm f/4, focal length 400mm. On tripod. Photo B: Camera: Nikon D3s, Manual Mode, Aperture: f/4, Shutter speed: 1/1250s, ISO 1600, Spot metering, Spot focus, Auto-focus Continuous. Lens: Sigma 180mm Macro f/3.5. On monopod. Shutter speed is the most important setting when photographing hummingbirds in…

10 Jul 2013

How To Increase the Number of Sharp Photographs

There are specific camera settings and equipment factors that influence sharpness of the subject and overall photograph. Get the most value from the camera’s focus functions by understanding and applying these tips: Depth of Field Depth of field is how much of a given photograph is in sharp focus, from front to back. Only the subject you are focused on is tack sharp. Other elements in front of and behind the subject will be somewhat sharp. The following factors control…

10 Jun 2013

Capture Picture Perfect Butterfly Photographs

Follow these tips to get picture perfect butterfly photos: Use a macro lens with a minimum focus distance 12 inches or less so you can capture close-up, full frame detail. Position yourself at eye level to the butterfly. Keep the composition very simple. Do a four corner perimeter check around your frame and physically move your body to eliminate or add elements. Look for butterflies that are in pristine condition (i.e., no chips in their wings, both antennas, all legs, etc.).…